Admin_Smith's blog

Anyone that donates to @LexxieTanium can have a Super Lemonade Factory Steam key

http://www.gofundme.com/bs7874

Lexxie Tanium is a young  and talented Game Dev, Artist, and Author whose life's troubles have
influenced and inspire her work. We became friends through social networking and I've been

following her career since then.

 The developer of the very successful game "Super Lemonade Factory" is generously donating keys

for his game to anyone who makes a donation.

Please make a donation and spread the word to help this fellow game dev and rising star who has

fallen on hard times.

 

   The Original Article "Top 5 Secrets of Highly Funded Kickstarters"   Originally published on 29th, April 2013 - Tutorial written by RandomExile
  For indie developers, Kickstarter is an unparalleled fundraising platform, bypassing the need for traditional venture capitalists or big-label publishers. But even so, 56% of all projects fail, and many more which reach their goal fall short of achieving their full potential...

$28 Failure
Figure 1: Don't be this guy.

Great Projects Still Fail

It's not enough to have the perfect game. No matter how stunning your visuals or how compelling your gameplay, if you don't nail down the Kickstarter fundamentals and sell your passion and vision, you won't engage potential backers.

Halo of Dutyshock 7
Figure 2. Just give me the all-digital soundtrack and hang your veiled promises of unlimited wealth.

Not All Best Practices are Created Equal

Everyone knows the basics: have a video; give regular updates; set a small goal; and keep your campaign short. But, what sets apart the most successful, 200%- to 400%-funded campaigns from the ones which just squeak by, or, more likely, die in obscurity?


Figure 3. ...nor do they dump wheelbarrows of cash into an awkwardly constructed fail-pit.

1) Develop Your Community FIRST

As indie developers, who are less likely to have widespread name or brand recognition (and may have difficulty obtaining press coverage at all), it's crucial to have an established, motivated community base before your campaign. Once you launch, you have 30 days to gain or maintain momentum, but you have to start off strong in order to inspire confidence in future backers (shorter campaigns tend to be more successful).


Figure 4. Somehow I was hoping there'd be more of us.

Construct 2's own Super Ubi Land earned 20% of its $5,000 goal on day one, from 17% of its eventual total backers. By day five Ubi reached 55% of its goal, virtually assuring success: 99% of projects which reach 60% funding ultimately succeed. While your fellow Scirra members can't be taken for granted, being a respected, engaged community member is a great way to build a following.

Many successful projects use independent web pages and social media to generate interest during the development cycle leading up to the campaign itself. These communities become your most ardent ambassadors and can exponentially expand your reach.

2) Respect Others' Communities

You need to gain exposure to succeed, but there are only a few things which will earn you deeper scorn than blundering into a Gamespot forum and cross-posting commercial spam. Forum regulars are going to hate you, your fans, and your product when 30 people with zero to four posts and account creation dates of yesterday show up and start shouting fanboy admiration.

GTFO
Figure 5. ... everyone else will be less hospitable.

Be respectful. There's a legitimate place for promoting your project, but it takes the right approach, and you want to productively add to the communities you reach, not violate what they feel to be their orderly sanctuary with commercialism.

Start a Developer's Blog

Start your blog well in advance of your KS campaign on your own site (remember, KS is one of the LAST steps in your indie development process), and provide periodic, substantive updates about the game on the forums with links back to your site. Share pictures of the game in progress, the models your artists are using, progress on the storyline, etc. The key is to provide meaningful content all along, until announcing your upcoming KS campaign is just a natural extension of your work.

Train Your Fans to be Ambassadors

If your fans want to post comments, think carefully about giving them some basic guidance. First, if they aren't established members of the community, they probably shouldn't post at all, or only sparingly. Second, for those who do, they should remember that less is more, they should post only in the most appropriate areas of the forum (like your Dev Blog!), and only post useful and insightful commentary on the game and project, with links to additional content.

3) Prepare for the Blindside

It might not happen to you, but if it does, it could cost you thousands of dollars and turn success into failure.

One thing project creators don't plan for: highly motivated and panicky people searching for evidence that your project misrepresents the smallest claim or doesn't live up to their expectations. (See the following section for three of the biggest pitfalls.)

Once offended, without even attempting to contact you, they will begin spamming your comments, your discussion board and the whole of the interwebs with the gospel of your anti-consumerist betrayal.


Figure 7. THERE WILL BE NO SURVIVORS.

How do You React?


Will the rest of your backers sense even the slightest lack of confidence, control, authority, organization, sincerity, or even-temperedness in your response? You're the captain of your ship, and as you go, so goes the campaign. Don't panic! You can make things right by thinking carefully about the nature of the complaints and addressing the true fears and concerns behind them in a firm but gentle manner.

Kitten
Figure 6. Everything ends badly on the internet.

Treat Your Backers with Respect


Begin putting together an update immediately, and address the issue(s) directly. If they feel that you have misrepresented your need for funding, be explicit about your budget, where your money is coming from, and exactly how it will be used. Never lie, always give more information than you think you need to, and respond to every individual backer who contacts you, thanking them for their support and passion for the project.

4) The Unholy Trinity: DRM, DLC, and Exclusive Content

Nothing will derail your campaign and trigger a blindside (per above) faster than hints of Digital Rights Management (DRM), Downloadable Content (DLC) add-ons, or expanded game content available only to certain tiers of backers. When people partner with you to create your game, they want good faith, trust in them that matches the trust they've given you, and they want ownership.

Digital Rights Management (DRM)

While most game makers understand that PC gamers (the majority of KS backers) don't want DRM blocking their freedom to use their software when, where, and how they want, many backers detest even Steamworks' initial authentication, and for these backers , nothing other than a standalone download which is theirs for all time can be considered truly DRM-free. As creator, you can choose your content delivery system, but you must be perfectly clear what that is and how or if you attempt to manage your players' use of the software.

Vader

Open full size image
Figure 8. ...and so, Calrissian, we've interlinked the continuous server authentication back to Coruscant with the station's emergency self-destruct. You know, for security.

 

Downloadable Content (DLC)

Backers will also be alert for any signs that you've placed your profit-motive ahead of your passion to deliver the best, most complete game you can. While most fans might be delighted six months after publication to see that you've released an add-on campaign or expansion pack, if you release DLC at the same time as the game or shortly thereafter, they're going to assess that you cut off part of the core game so you could sell it for an extra $20, thereby delivering an incomplete game and underhandedly increasing the product's ultimate cost.

Exclusive Content

Be extremely careful what you offer as exclusive content to backers. Typically, anything which constitutes or affects gameplay is off-limits. While offering the soundtrack, a place in the credits, physical souvenirs, beta test access, etc. in different reward tiers are all quite common and reasonable, never create "more-" and "less-complete" versions of your game. When it comes to the game itself, all of your backers want to know they are getting the best, most complete experience you can give them.

5) Plan Your Reward Structure

Well-balanced reward tiers cover your expenses and incentivize large pledges, while giving your backers the feeling they got more than their money's worth. Handling your expenses can be tricky: you need to ensure that you aren't offering more in rewards than your backers are pledging, which means carefully calculating production, labor, postage, and even tax implications like VAT, where applicable.

Your greatest efficiency will be in all-digital rewards, but physical goods can be a powerful way for some backers to personally connect with your project. The one reward you absolutely cannot do without is a discounted copy of the final product, closely followed by the game's soundtrack (assuming the music is an integral part of the experience).


Figure 9. Well there went the art budget.

Price your reward tiers so that backers with a range of budgets can all meaningfully participate. Just having a reward tier below $20 can increase your chance of success by over 50%! But at each step, make sure that the reward feels generous relative to the pledge. Ensuring each tier is valuable on its own, distribute the rewards so that there's always a reason to stretch one's pledge just a little more.

Avoid "dead zones" wherein a lesser tier is stacked with goodies and the next higher tier is uninspiring. Even if you succeed, you'll have lost any number of pledges and upgrades which might have helped you make an even better game, and it could well be the difference between being funded or not.

Make sure to carefully talk out your reward structure with keen friends, family, and potential backers: while you'll have some room to add tiers during your campaign, you can't change one once someone's pledged on it.

Conclusion

Developing your community, respecting the communities you reach out to, reacting to unexpected conflict with poise and grace, avoiding the DRM/DLC/Exclusive-Content pitfalls, and carefully planning your reward structure will put you well ahead of the average campaign, and on the road to making your project a reality.

 

Good luck!



Announcing Naked Game Play

Social Networking Platform for the Indie Game Developers

If you’re involved in making games, you know how important social networking can be.

Naked Game Play is not just another forum site, but a full-blown social networking platform for indie game developers of all shapes and sizes.

With an emphasis on marketing and publishing, Naked Game Play isn't just another Facebook either, but a place to promote your games, projects, and services.

Whether you're already in game development or just getting started, Naked Game Play has some powerful social tools to help get you in the game.

For starters you can get set up with a single click through any of the top social networking providers you're already affiliated with but, the integration doesn't end there. You can integrate your Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn accounts to feed directly into your wall feed and share your posts simultaneously on Twitter, Facebook and Linkedin. Post and share screen shots, videos of your game, artwork, and more.

Once signed in, you can customize your profile from within your dashboard and add your own avatar.

Aside from having forums, blogs, chat, events, videos, news, and group features all aimed at the marketing end of promoting your games.

Your dashboard and profile provide the format to create your own internal pages and/or link to external web pages you may already have on your current website, or for any other purpose, making Naked Game Play a great place to start especially if you don't have a website and you're just starting out with your first game.

It isn't just for game developers, but anyone associated in the gaming industry. Graphic artist, composers, publishers, and more are all welcome.

In addition there will be several private forums for subscribers of the big list of game publishers.

Naked Game Play provides a clean, crisp interface, that’s easy to navigate all in a responsive web design that runs on any device.

Of course, it's just getting started ended need you to make it work. So be among the first to sign up and start showing off your work.

Come and promote, your games, artwork, screenshots, music, ideas, and connect with others game developers. Learn more about how to promote yourself and market your games.

 

www.nakedgameplay.com

Promote Your Games Shamelessly

Developing good work habits while developing your games.


It’s been more than a month since my last post, and I have a lot like to cover here.
One thing I've noticed recently, while working the game development forums is the amount of frustration some game developers seem to be experiencing when trying to market their games.

Now there are many ways to attempt a market and distribute your game. The first coming to mind obviously is through the mobile stores, iTunes, Google Play, and the numerous other Android app stores.

Learning to develop games, then actually making a game, can be daunting tasks in and of themselves. A particular example that I noticed was of someone who posted a game on the FGL distribution platform. He posted in the forum about his frustration that he had only licensed his game to 3 publishers at $400 per game, certainly not enough to make his efforts developing a single worthwhile in the long run. The next example was of the developer who took his games to market on the Apple Store, Google Play, and 1 or 2 smaller Android based app stores. His game sold for 99 cents and his total net after the first month was under $25. He noted that he felt like giving up after all that effort.

Now I'm not knocking FGL. I think they have a great platform and I plan to use it myself but, if you're going to market your game, weather directly to publishers for the mobile web or on App Stores, you're going to need a marketing strategy. If you think the other very successful developers are going to share there strategies with openly on forums, you're mistaken. You're going to have to do your homework and that means research. Whatever your game type, people aren't going to come to you. You're going to have to take it to them!

Learning, then developing, then researching, then packaging for the various platforms, and coding API's for mobile web publishers involves a lot. Each step in the various phases from development to making money is exhausting. One rejection from a publisher or bad starting sales is enough to make anyone to give up. Especially, if you are so solo developer, it can become even more discouraging.

And I’ve simplified the above steps I haven't included making your website, developing graphics, blogging, and a number of other things that can be involved to make your games a success.

If you are in the first stages of developing your first game and feeling likes it’s too much for you alone, it's a good idea to try to get a team together. Not everyone can go solo.

I'm a solo developer and while I don't make my own graphics, I designed and built my own website, write my blog, manage a news feed site for independent game developers focused on marketing, author an EBook that have monthly updates to contend with, and have a social networking platform for independent game developers under development, of coarse, build my own games.

It’s a lot of work. And I get discouraged too. The leading cause of which, is exhaustion. So here are some good tips and guidelines to follow to avoid falling into a rut or worse, giving up.

Have a plan and write it down. Make lists. When you write it down it helps to keep your thoughts organized, especially when you start feeling overwhelmed. This is important to keep clear sight of your vision. It helps you stay organized.

Organization is the Key to Success and Attitude Determines Outcome. Those are two famous quotes I try to remind myself of frequently and live by.

Make lists. Try to simplify things as much as possible. I do my lists on my Smartphone. I have a number of devices but my galaxy note 3 is my primary tool. Even the first draft of this article I do by dictating using voice to text on my Smartphone. I generally don't do it all at once. It starts with an idea, and while I'm doing other things, generally during my research time, I gather information and record thoughts. Just a paragraph here in there and the before you know it, things starts to take shape. Ideas become clearer. When I’ve gathered enough I push it to my laptop and edit it before publishing.

Like everything else I do, whether developing a game, writing an article, or preparing for any form of work, I just throw it up there. I always tell my friends when giving advice, try gather a lot of things on your palate to work with. Don't be afraid to put together too much information in all its forms. Whether it’s graphics for a game, notes for a blog article, or just a quick thought, write it down. Then later organize it into lists. Just like a painter, you need to have a lot of colors to work with. But through the development process you learn to strip away what you don't need, I think it was Michelangelo who said the sculpture was already there I just had to remove the excess pieces from the stone.

Get enough rest. It's easy to get burnt out from overworking, especially after a big run of work fueled by motivation. Being motivated is an emotional rollercoaster. One minute you're excited about everything you're working your ass off on and the next you're having a psychological crash.

When it all starts to get to be too much I stop, have a beer, relax, and start making a list. Even after making the list it can seem overwhelming. Prioritize your list and take it one item at a time. With each thing you complete comes a sense of satisfaction and it gets easier especially when the motivation returns.

Being an entrepreneur and making money solo isn't easy. If you can develop a team and share the efforts, you can often bring even more success financially in the long run. Not to mention when you work with other people it helps you stay motivated.

Make sure you include research in your strategy. You've got to research how you're going to make money. How you're going to successfully market your game. You can't just think you're going to depend on the single market distribution platform to sell your mobile html5 web games, nor can you expect to have a hit on the game stores without some sort of strategy. Whether your strategy involves a specific genre that you're developing your game for, some form of keyword focus for searches, or the use a review sites, just to name a few, have a plan.

Having a plan is the best way to relieve anxiety in any situation.

So to summarize this in a list:

Stay rested and healthy.
Make a plan
Make a list.
Constantly step back and reorganize ( time management ).
Work.
Research.
Make a list.
Work.
Research.
Make a list.
Work! Work! Work!
Repeat this list!


In the end, time management, organization, and a good attitude is what it is all about.

Most importantly, don't ever give up. Becoming an independent game developer is not my first business endeavor. Over the years I've read countless business development books and I always noticed a common statement made by those who made it really big, just a single word.

Perseverance!

Everyone fails and makes mistakes. Pick yourself up and learn from your mistakes and accept that it is part of the natural process to success and you will be successful.

Ending on that note let me talk about some other things briefly.

The Big List of Game Publishers: I just completed a major update and started a new format that really developed out of the use of the list and through continued expansion and additions. In the next update I plan to expand the prelude with more information about preparation and guidelines before submitting your games to publishers including major increase in reviews sites.

Naked Game Play: I found what I believe is a viable solution to provide the private forum within a social networking platform for independent game developers and hope to have it up within the next two weeks. Watch for that announcement.

Authoring. I have 3 new books now under development. More about that next month.

Final Contact: I've been putting some time back into my passion project, FINAL CONTACT. I spent a lot of time this past week rendering images in 3d Studio Max for animated sequences for the game in addition to purchasing some great new 3D objects and plan to start working on my promotional video to take the game to Crowdfunder.

My HTML5 Games: I started to submit my games to more publishers but, I'm moving slowly with that. While I've had a lot of publishers approach me, the process of coding API's and any modifications required is draining me. I have so many things on my plate, I can't move too fast with. While it is going unexpectedly well, I got a little burnt out and fell into a rut, hence my inspiration for writing this blog article.

I have also engaged with several other developers and hope to start partnering in my efforts so I can reduce my workload and increase my financial success for everyone involved and allow me enough time to continue to work on my other projects.

I have more than a few ideas for my next blog article, but I don't want to say what it will be because I haven't decided what will be first. I try to make all of my efforts work together to help promote every aspect of what I'm working on. And that's my final piece of advice. Try to make everything you do compliment every other thing you do. From game development to your website, blogging and twittering, make it all work together. You'll find that it gets easier as you progress.

Until next time, good luck marketing and stay motivated!


 

2 weeks without a blog post, so I'm behind to say the least. Unfortunately I've had a few setbacks with my recent move from New Jersey to Pennsylvania. The move itself actually went smooth but my rhythm or momentum was broken in the process. Of coarse moving is time a consuming endeavor and took a toll on my work time, however I did manage to maintain a good level of activity through Twitter, on the forums , and by email when I could.

Unfortunately I've had to put on hold anymore attempts to solicit my games until after I was settled and finished a few upgrades. As I said in my last post, I was going to go back and add some more polish to my games and in that process I started to really take some time upgrade the functionality. When I first endeavored to make mobile web games to market for non-exclusive licensing , I had one word in mind  "simple" and I kept repeating that word to myself throughout the process of developing these games. Always tempted to do something to make what I thought would be a better game, but kept reminding myself not to overdo it.  This misconception formed from studying others, and not really understanding the landscape for the html5 market in general. I just didn't think it was necessary to include many of the bells and whistles that would be required and a native install game. I tried to focus on making the game fun but simple.

Of course my perception has changed since I originally developed those games and as I've gone back to upgrade them a bit , I realize a very important thing along the way , that I should have trusted my own judgement. All along my gut was telling me to put something extra "here" or do something else over "there", all those thoughts that go through your head at design time.

Of course not only of my perception has changed but it continues to change as the market for html5 games is rapidly changing. I've been privy to be able to speak with some of the top publishers that are out there recently. In addition to studying a lot of the market and see what's been happening in terms of its growth.

In 2013 sales of smartphones and tablets have skyrocketed and tablets had taken away half of the internet time previously used on standard computers. Recognizing this massive shift in the user audience, for the first time major media and advertising companies who never spent a dime before on internet advertising or media platforms are now making a hard change in direction to spend big dollars to shift into internet-related advertising under doing it with the mobile in mind. Many of these companies already recognize that mobile web and html5 games are the perfect platform to use as an advertising tool. The trend becomes increasingly more visible with very passing trade show.


The demand for html5 games is growing faster than the supply it seems. And while it does seem there has been a trend by some bigger publishers to consolidate some of the html5 game market, new startups are springing up every day to fill the gaps.

Smartphones and tablets are like a religion converting the masses throughout the world allowing for easy access to the Internet. More and more is the demand for mobile web games that run as close to a native experience as possible and they want them to be small, 3MB small, for fast downloading time without an install.

With all this in mind, I've been taking a little extra time improve upon this initial round of games that I made. And I can't say that I'm not happy with the results. Three of the games now include top 10 high scores leaderboard.
To the games I changed the level dynamic to make it more challenging and for the final game I have something different in mind but I'm not going to discuss the details now. I should be finished in the next day or two and then I'll be making my attack run to solicit all the appropriate publishers.  I'm anxious to get back to work on some of the other prototypes that I developed.

Which brings me to my next topic, FINAL CONTACT. It's hard to believe I found time to get some work done on final contact, but work I did, and things are back under way. I've been rendering some great new 3d material I have for upcoming levels And I just posted a level 2 gameplay video on my website www.neoprofessor.com.com. I enjoy working with Camtasia and have begun to work on a promotional trailer which I hope to use the bring this game to crowdfunder.

In addition to all that I got quite a bit of work done on THE BIG LIST of GAME PUBLISHERS improving the tagging structure and making numerous additions bringing it upwards of about 88 pages I believe. I just updated on the website yesterday counting over 70 flash game publishers and over 60 HTML5 game publishers and with other sources of monetization and or potential leads up to over 250 resources total, but those figures were actually a little conservative and the actual final counts are bit higher. The truth is the list is exploding with new contact and sources. I really need to get an exact count, but its hard when it seems I am adding something new every few hours. Between my website, blog, and Twitter, publishers are already seeking me out to get entered into the big list. So I've initiated a strategy to reach out to the publishers and the other potential lead sources asking them to write their own listings what their specific genres and specifications.

But I'm not done yet, I also started a private forum for those that purchase THE BIG LIST of PUBLISHERS. The form provides a format for developers to share their experiences good or bad with each other. That forum takes place on my new social networking platform that is exclusively for Indy game developers market.

www.nakedgameplay.com

NAKED GAME PLAY is a place where Indy's can promote their games shamelessly. A Facebook like experience with an active wall. You can post photos, screenshots, videos, chat and more. You can create groups and events with private forums or start a blog. Integrates with Facebook and other social platforms.

I plan to include lots of resources for developers , both pros and newbies and I'm inviting game artist, publishers, and other related sources to get involved.

So go ahead and get a sneak peek, and be amongst the first to sign on. It's completely free.

And I think that's all for this post, but I have so much to talk about that you may see the next post in a few days. In my next post of follow-up more I'm one has actually transpired between me and some publishers.

As always, you can follow me here and on twitter @nakedgametalk





 


Well, it’s been a grueling week of 12 to 14 hour days, but an absolute labor of love. As I stated at the end of my last article, I got some good responses from my second attempt submitting my games to publishers. I have 1 publisher interested in a non exclusive licensing and I've been approached by 2 others for revenue share programs. So let me clarify my approach and share what I have learned.

Everything I do, I do it with marketing in mind. So I started slowly, to test the waters, and so I could gauge the response without screwing the pooch. I didn't want to submit to every publisher on the planet only to discover that I had issues I wasn't aware of and blow it with every publisher right out of the box.
So even after my second round, which went much better than the first, I still feel I have many things I need to do to improve before I continue and expect the best level of success.

First thing I've learned is all publishers are not created equal and they have different standards. So let me share this prime example.
In my first round of submissions, I submitted to softgames.de, from which I received a response with a checklist of standards and requirements, very professional and much appreciated.

Following this was an article posted by Alexander Krug from softgmes.de n HTML5 Game Dev forum that you should read here: http://www.html5gamedevs.com/topic/4331-top-10-tipps-for-html5-games
Now softgames.de is on the higher end of the spectrum and they have a more stringent requirement for their html5 game sponsorship.

As for me I've decided to step back one more time and polish my games up to a higher level, both in terms of the mechanical aspects and in the actual gameplay itself. Also, I'd like to take some time to do a little bit better art work. An important point to note, artwork really sells the game. I'll spend the better part this week on it along with some new things I will be announcing about "Final Contact".
I would have already started at that this week but I wanted to finish my new ebook "The Big List" at the request of some of my dev friends and associates.
All in all it's been a very exciting week. For me, it's been really about understanding the requirements and which type of publishers to solicit to at this particular level and time with my html5 games.

Now let's really talk marketing strategy. A few months ago, I began to realize the time would be approaching when I would need to market my games. So I began early on developing an extensive list of publishers and viable sources for monetization. As I developed an understanding of the different ways I could earn revenue from my games I decided on multi level strategy to start from the bottom up with my mobile web HTML 5 games.
I try to develop games not only be light enough to make the requirements but will also be quality enough to take to app markets, such as Android, IOS, and others.

Following which I would try to take advantage of some Facebook type of marketing strategies. All of which I'll be talking about when we cross that bridge.
There are also quite a number of new partner organizations emerging that I know that I think we're going to have to talk about that more.

Of course if you're not making your game for mobile web platform the technical requirements are not as stringent for the web, and if you're going to use some form of packaging solutions to take to app markets, you'll be able to probably get away with a lot of those requirements simply because they wont exist, such as sizing issues. However you’re going need a higher quality game.
During much of the last 2 years, coupled with my development came countless hours of study and research about the market and gaming industry in general. One thing I love about the gaming industry is that there are just so many different marketing opportunities for your game.

As I noted earlier I spent most of this week completing my work on new eBook "The Big List of Game Publishers". It's a comprehensive marketing list of game publishers, partners and various other monetization platforms.
Whenever I'm going to market any product, I compile a list like this of the various organizations and platforms that I feel I'll be able to take advantage of on some level. Since, I plan to develop games at all levels, I do extensive research find out who the players are and mark them for easy access communication via the web at a later date.

When I was going through my final round of editing, I really marveled at the amount of resources there are and moreover, how many more are springing up.  Spending a lot of time recently on the html5 game developer forums a lot lately, I can't help but notice how many people post help looking for publishers. So, urged on by some close friends and associates, I'm going to share my marketing expertise in the form of this distributor list. I'm not making a big announcement and to tell the truth this blog is not that will read yet, so my writing about it here is not going to be driving me home run hitting sales.
I'm going to be in adding lot more data to the list, updating it monthly and accepting submissions and updates from the uses of the list.

I really feel this is a strong resource for a developer of any level to find revenue generating means from. That being said, I really want to maintain the integrity and the value of the list. I'm offering you have an introductory price of 49. 99. I want to keep the price point high enough to prevent it turning into some sort of spammers list, and yet within reach to anyone who is ready to start making money with their game. Of course it's a great educational tool as well. Especially if you know your 2 months for 3 months away from release, and you really need to get a handle on where you're going with your game. Especially because understanding where to go with your game may also help you shape some of the final stages of your games development. This List can provide a Road Map.
In any case, I'm taking a soft approach with the release, I'm not sure if I'm going to start posting it on forums yet. I'm probably going to try to reach out a bit 1 on 1 to developers who posted the looking for publishers list and I'll really be looking for feedback from those make the first purchases.

In the prelude, I give strong advice about how to approach this list so overly ambitious and under ready individuals don't start submitting unqualified material to the wrong sources. However even if someone is just looking to make money for free with low level free postings on game sites where they can run their ads within their own games in a free to play type model, I include plenty of that as well.
Even games that may not meet the criteria to sell for non-exclusive sponsorships can make revenues. There's always someone who's willing to play something for free.

Remember you can always ask me questions, I won't be discussing specific company names in most situations normally or disclosing my own revenues here on my blog, but obviously sharing my experiences with soft games was worth sharing, but I will be sharing marketing specifics more liberally.

As I said I'm going to take a soft approach, and not just go spamming me list all over the planet.

Until next time dot dot dot

Damn voice to text!
 
Remember to follow me on twitter @nakedgametalk


 So after my last post, I awoke the next morning with an unbelievable migraine, which crippled me for over 14 hours. After I was so exhausted from the headache I could not work. The following morning I received emails from some developers friends , whom I had asked to take a look at my games before I started to submit to publishers.
 
 Well they gave me some solid advice and no sooner did I finish reading the mail then another one arrived from another developer friend who also added his input.  All gave me high marks for my websites, but as far as my games went, they had a few things to say.
 
 The critique they gave me was related to mechanical issues and not the gameplay themselves. I had problems with my orientation when the device turns and I need a little more polish. I also had issues getting the games to view at full-size properly on a broad enough range of phones and devices. The critics were pretty generalized, but much appreciated. I'm a big believer in failing up. Meaning I'm not afraid to make mistakes fast and learn from them fast. So I took a few more days to polish up the games.
 The following Monday I sent the games out to a few publishers , to test the waters, and then waited.
I then received an email from a prominent publisher, whom gave me some great advice or rather a checklist I'm specific issues that they look for, or rather look to avoid.
 So I took another week to polish up my games some more. I did extensive testing of the different scaling settings, such as full screen scaling inner, full screen scaling elder, letterbox scaling, and letterbox integer: scaling. In addition, I have some serious issues concerning the removal of address bars when the games are played in the mobile web browser, which I should have mentioned all of these games are designed to run on mobile web browsers. One thing publishers look for is a native like game experience or as close to it as you can get in the mobile web browser. That being said, I had a lot of work to do.
I developed all my games using construct 2, and I love the development environment. However I had to go outside the software to resolve of some of my issues and resorted to using javascript inside my html file that the game is played in. JavaScript helped me solve the address bar issues and I did extensive work to make a smooth orientation change when the device is rotated. That number of other small issues that I corrected and made some modifications to the games themselves, that I thought would improve the game quality.
 
 This past Friday, I tested the waters again and sent out a few more request to publishers. Since then I've had some positive responses but as of yet I have yet to close a deal. Currently I'm talking to several publishers and things are improving, including my attitude.
 I didn't expect things to go this long but unfortunately these are some of the pitfalls that happens when you start a marketing campaign around a new product.
However, I have high hopes that things are about to start going well and I am proceeding cautiously, making small changes before I try submitting to a few more publishers. As soon as I have more to tell, I will publish a new article,  and cover in more detail some of the things that I did wrong, and the things I did right to get things back on track.
Like I said, I really big fan of failing up . I'm not afraid to make mistakes, but I didn't go into this blindly. I did quite a bit of research and I have been working on my marketing strategy for the better part of the year. Unfortunately like most newbies, I still have things to learn, good and bad, but I intend to make the most of both.
As someone once told me, there is no such thing as luck,  luck is when opportunity meets preparation. And on that note I'll leave you until the next post.
NeoProfessor
Dominick Gentile

Will it be “the best Christmas ever” or a disappointing one….


Here I am on the eve hub starting my solicitations to sell my first html5 games. For the massive amount of work this week (actually the last 12 weeks), It seems it's been a season of endless 12 hour days, 7 days a week. For those that are familiar with my story, I started out running a game which I am still continuing called Final Contact.  A pseudo 3d space simulator game, but after reading Matthew Bowden’s Ebook " Making Money with HTML 5 " , I decided to change directions short term develop smaller mobile web based games for mobile devices.

So here I am, frantically trying to give my website a facelift and the look for the future. I've been using that NetObjects Fusion to design it. It lets me get from prototype to design pretty quickly. Unfortunately it's behind the times, but I didn't have time to really build my site in Dreamweaver. I'm already testing content management systems like WordPress and Joomla open source I probably will be migrated to one of those platforms before another month passes. But I need to get up to enough speed to start selling the games that I finished.

In addition to employing this game development and marketing strategy, I plan to use this blog and another news portal site "paper.li", to create a newspaper site filled with and independent game marketing related news and resources. I'm still in the throes of customizing my content, but it's coming along nicely. Oddly named "Naked Game Talk News “after this blog, I plan to promote and talk about final contact here and share my marketing experiences, successes and failures.

For those that don't know me, I used to be a top SEO specialist I made a very lucrative living in years past. I spent the last year reassessing and learning the new ins and outs of SEO marketing and optimization. Nowhere is it more complex the mobile game market. Besides the games I'm making to market for non-exclusive sponsorship, I also plan to market some games via Facebook, Apple Store, Google app markets, and or sites like Steam. Of course all of these games are not the same or of the same types. So I'll be sharing all that with you here and hope you subscribe & follow me on twitter. I'll also be glad to answer any questions along the way as I talk about my successes and failures here.

I originallychoose Google's blogspot for my blog, because I love everything Google, however my last post in December did not post. Actually that's not entirely true.  It actually did post, I know because I received some personal responses from friends. That now that post appears to have been deleted. And I'm actually been having a few problems with their management console. As a result, I'm going to rewrite this previous December post.

 

 

December  Post

 
   Hard to believe it's been 6 months since I created this blog and I'm only beginning now. Only days after that 1st post, I was laid off from my full time job. I immediately went to work, studying, strategizing, planning, and of course writing games.

  When I say studying, I've been studying the market for HTML5 games, strategizing for marketing opportunities, and planning how to approach making it full time. Understanding the different types of ways to make money producing games is not easy. Been doing a lot of research since I first started making my first game and since then gained quite a bit of understanding of the many different ways, types, and approaches there are to making games, as well as marketing them. As for me, I'm going to be taking a multilevel approach and Chronicle in it here in my blog.

  In my research I came across an e-book “Making Money with HTML 5 games” by Mathew from “True Valla” who writes HTML5 games, has a nice blog, and chronicles his earnings monthly. A great book, I highly recommend it if you're just starting out and trying to understand how to navigate through the murky waters of marketing the HTML 5. It's only $30 and is pretty straightforward and no-nonsense.
  I'm also developing a larger game that I plan to market on my own on both, but not limited to the Apple Store and Android markets. I want to take some of my HTML 5 games to various other markets.
 So, if you're just starting to develop HTML 5 games or already have been and are trying to understand how to market your games, while I hope this resource is going to help.

 

Until next time…

Hi, Im Dom and welcome Naked Game Talk.

  What's it all about?
For me its all about Indie Game Development for web and mobile platforms. If your an Indie developer, this blogs for you. Im an indie developer working alone to develop 2D games for web and mobile platforms. I'll be using this blog to share my experiences, successes and failures. I'll be posting frequently and starting a twitter account. I'll also be trying to bring developers together to share resourses, share experiences while attempting to entertain.

Ok, so here's one of my first games called
"FINAL CONTACT". Still understand development, but just about to release a free version.

Http://www.neoprofessor.com/finalcontact/

I'll be talking a lot about my games as I go through the various development stages.
So please take a look and enjoy it. Post your opinions, thoughts, questions, ideas, etc...

Dom


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